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zombies. >> black. >> they're black. >> i don't know if they are white. it's up there. >> you shut up, lady. >> the black zombies. >> they move slow. >> they move slow. >> all right. that was quite possibly the greatest moment in game show history, ra. i don't know. what is worse? she is assuming zombies or block or that other woman assuming zombies are slow. they are both derogatory in a way. >> i don't know if she knew this, but from the beginning of sin that you ma history zombies were based on zoo-doo -- voo-doo and witch doctors and "i walk with a zombie" and i don't think it was in her mind. maybe she saw a whole table of black people and black, black, black, and she went crazy. >> it was like she was thinking don't say anything about -- don't say anything -- are there black people around? it is like whether you riding a mountain bike and on a trail and going for a rock and you say i don't want to hit the rock, i don't want to hit the rock. >> don't say black, don't say black, don't say black. >> maybe we are not giving her enough credit. >> she was knowledgeable? >> she was kn
saying a lot of these people don't even think i was born here and he wasn't even sure what he meant by here. that's the theology of it, chris. there's a theological belief at the heart of this that obama -- the president is somehow not only not legitimate, not american but not even from here. that's an element of theology with these people. that's where everything starts. goes back to birtherism and back to their rejection, sort of like tissue rejection of him from the body politic, they have never, ever accepted his jittery. >> i think that's cosmic thing is totally true you said. just down to the narrow conversation i was having with that u.s. congressman. i said if you're for ted cruz, we know he was born to an american mother born in canada. i believe he's an american. i'm a pretty liberal guy about this. most are. the most crazy case was donald trump saying he was born in kenya. therefore if you accept cruz as a legitimate president you should accept obama as president. that was a narrow question to put to this character and he wouldn't answer it, even in the narrow bounds i se
. and the president is fully aware of this. i remember him saying, a lot of these people don't even think i was born here and he wasn't sure what he meant here. that's the theology of it. there's a theological belief at the heart of this, the president is somehow not only legitimate, not american, not even from here, that's an element of theology with these people. it goes back to the birthism and rejection of him from the body politic. they never accepted his legitimacy. >> i think a cosmic thing is true. >> if for you're ted cruz who was born to an american mother up in kentucky, i'm all for that. the worst crazy thing is donald trump is president obama was born to an american mother in kenya. if you accept cruz as a president then you should accept president obama as a legitimate president. he wouldn't answer it. even in the narrow bounds i set it up. >> chris you're asking for something they can't give you. you're asking for some moral and political integrity and consistency and they don't have it when it comes to this president. >> number two. goes to tea party congressman of michigan during a
a book signing. the book came out yesterday. she will have a book signing during lunch. next is don porter, the producer of gideon's army. the clip we just saw. don is a founder of trilogy films and director of gideon's army. it premiered in the 2010 sundance festival. she's an a -- she's on the 2012 hot shot directors emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no
for me. i can see there is an honest person in the system. i kind of got mixed up in it and how, i don't know. i'm glad and they actually had people that care about people behind bars. i'm more aware of my freedom taking it for granted. i'm free and loving life. [ applause ] >> i would like to ask our first panel to come up and take their seats. >> i'm going to start on my right to your left here and introduce karen hooper, the author of chasing gideon and i just want to announce that she will be holding a book signing. the book came out yesterday. she will have a book signing during lunch. next is don porter, the producer of gideon's army. the clip we just saw. don is a founder of trilogy films and director of gideon's army. it premiered in the 2010 sundance festival. she's an a -- she's on the 2012 hot shot directors emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of ope
't know what else to do. i decided the wall -- i don't have any tattoos. i'm going to get the last name of every case i lost. hopefully i won't fill my back up. since this is going on the wall, i feel it has to go on my back. >> when you work as a public defender, you saved somebody and they are like what does that mean? i defend people who are charged with people committing crime. they say how can you defend people? i say it's about the sanctity of human liberty and the cost if you want to take it. >> most important is trying to keep their moral up and try to keep their best interest at heart. i know for me when i relate to my clients i see them as cousins or brothers or uncles just because it's the face of the black community. so many of them are locked up and of course i'm having to work against their initial impression of public defender because their public defender somehow screwed them. >> how are you? >> good. >> sit over here. how are you? >> good. >> it's freezing outside. >> you know why i'm here. i'm trying to get a better understanding of the place where you were arrested.
, i remember him saying, you know, a lot of these people don't even think i was born here, and he wasn't sure what he meant by here. and that -- that's the theology of it, chris. there is a sort of theological belief at the heart of this that obama -- that the president is somehow not only not legitimate, not an american, but not even from here. that's an element of theology with these people at the heart -- that's where everything starts. goes back to birtherism, and it goes back to their rejection, sort of like their tissue rejection of him from the body of poll lick. they have never, never accepted his legitimacy. >> john, i think that cosmic thing is totally true. but john, just down to the narrow conversation i was having with that u.s. congressman. i said, if you're for ted cruz who we all know was born to an american mother in canada and i believe he's an american and eligible to run for president. i'm pretty liberal about this. most of us are. the worst crazy case is donald trump that president obama was born to an american mother in kenya. therefore if you should accept cruz,
lee. see you tomorrow at 5:00. don't go go anywhere. "mad money" with jim cramer starts right now. >>> my mission is simple. to make you money. i'm here to level the playing field for all investors. there's always a bull market somewhere and i promise to help you find it. "mad money" starts now. hey, i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." welcome to cramerica. other people want to make friends, i'm trying to save you a little money. my job is not just to entertain but to educate and teach you. so call me 1-800-743-cnbc. where can we find the best growth right here right now? isn't that the be all and end all behind so much of we're looking for in the stock market? including today when the dow sank 21 points. nasdaq advancedn .08%. it doesn't matter where we find growth. we always love it when we see it. tonight we hear from regeneron, not only has drugs that are making fortunes for shareholders right now, it also has drugs in the pipeline that could keep that growth going for many years to come. game changing medicines that are disrupting the market and crushing the competition. incl
did, which is reach out and get 61% of the hispanic vote. perry got -- >> you don't have an immigration bill. >> governors can do it easier than congress mmen and senators but governors need to reach out to the immigration communities in their states, in their cities, in their congressional districts. i believe we will see an immigration bill. i think the danger comes from whether obama really wants a bill. and the reason to wonder about that is he was president for all of 2009 and all of 2010 with congressional people in the senate. he didn't talk about a bill, woke up, went to bed. >> but. >> i'm talking about the -- the bill passed to the senate, not particularly my cup of tea, but it got a conversation going. what you do have is serious border security. not 47,000 troops on the border but border security. and you want to have something there for high tech, for the farming industry, and you want to do something for the people who are here so they don't have to live in the shadows and regularize their ability to be here and continue to work. >> where is grover norquist
proposition, mr. president, but we spent three years coming up with this other plan. we don't think this is going to work. here's the louisiana state insurance commissioner jim donelon. >> he acknowledged each state has to do what it tkpaoepls appropriate and what -- deems appropriate and what its law requires relative to implementation. we had a great dialogue, no doubt about that. but we also came away agreeing that there was a lot of difference of opinion as to whether or not we can or should do what he urged us to do last week. >> they had the meeting. they loved being in the white house, probably got a tour. in the end they have to watch out for their own backsides and their own private companies. they warned the president, what he's proposing now would amount to different rules and different policies, might result in higher premiums, not good for you and you, without underlying concerns for gaps in coverage. florida likes it. it allows people to renew their coverage. in indiana they say they will adopt the president's proposal. new york said tpho*efplt california is to announc
interesting. >> thank you, don. >> thank you. we appreciate that. let's get to the top of the hour and the top story now. >>> hello, everyone. i'm don lemon, you are in the cnn news room. it is 6:00 straight up here in the east. we are going to begin in los angeles. you need to watch this story. the widow of the tsa officer killed in the brutal attack at l.a.x. speaking out. listen. >> hello, everybody. thank you for coming out. i know you have been waiting for a statement from the family. thank you for respecting the fact we are hurting. my husband passed away. here is a statement. he was born and moved to the united states at the age of 15. he graduated from high school. we met in 1994 when i was 16 and he was 19 and have been together ever since. we married on valentine's day in 1998 and had two beautiful children. he worked for the tsa organization since 2010. he was a security officer. he was always excited to go to work and enjoy the passengers at l.a.x. he was a joyful person, always smiling and took pride in his duty to the american public. he was a great man who always sho
based on insider insights that the rest of us don't have will be giving their final order indications tonight to their brokers for how much stock they like. i can tell you from people i talked to that many large institutions are simply saying to goldman sachs, the keeper of the books for the deal. look, i do a lot of commission business and i'll take every share i can get. i want 10% of the deal. i want to circle 10% of the deal. that level of demand for a stock is pretty unprecedented, again with the exception of facebook. the reasoning is twofold. first is a good one. these institutional investors are very jazzed, they're excited about the possibility of owning shares in a company that's generated $620 million in revenue and super jazzed about the possibility of revenues increasing to about $1 billion the year after with double the profits. second, though, and this is what worries me about you. the big boys are betting that other less informed investors, people who use twitter and love it like me @jimcramer, people who don't know how to value the stock but just figure how can you go
. > pat died for no reason, mi hijo. people have got to know what these nursing homes consist of. they don't care, they're there for a paycheck. >> nora's lawyer shot video footage of pat's condition before he died - she hasn't been able to bring herself to watch it. >> and you've never watched this video? >> i've never watched the video. >> do you want to watch the video? >> no, i'm scared to see it. i can't. >> this video is critical evidence in nora's case. the images are disturbing. >> nora is trying to take care of pat. he's covered in sores. the sores on his foot are so bad that the bone is sticking out. >> he said he's in pain, give him something else. the man in this video is completely unrecognizable from the photos we saw at nora's house. >> [crying] i'm sorry. i'm sorry. the medicare review board gave amara only one star - defined as "much below average" in an overall rating. but despite that low rating, there have been no fines or penalties levied in at least the past three years. and across the us, there's little consistency to how facilities get fined for giving bad care. >>
you, it's going to turn around. don't think about it in a nuclear sense, but think strategic first, coming from great distance or no distance, to solve a problem. last, think about the conventional forces and moving and huge costs of standing armies and moving them to the problem. it's just the reality we have to deal with, and how we're going to do that, how are we going to afford it, those are the the questions, i think, that we're going to, as an alliance, come to grips with and understand how to do that; ours, we're not matching resources and capabilities with the security that we desire to have. >> thank you. >> other than that i'm in a good place. >> that leaves a good place. the leading expert brings a dose of reality, make it a concern, particularly such with europe. when you hear those speakers, particularly john cartwright's point about, you know, we have to be ability to exercise and leverage increasing speed and deploy our forces. do you see this happening in nato? is nato leveraging deemployability of the forces to provide adequate deterrent against threats from both n
who'll be fine anyway even though they went on the website trying to get health care and they don't and then they don't pay the penalty. >> this includes people who will have available to them other means. [inaudible] ♪ ♪ >> of course, the obamacare website problem. [laughter] [inaudible] >> yes, we still can. [laughter] reporter: in houston today, joe biden was talking about the economy. lou: millions of you and millions of americans losing their health care insurance is creating immense problems all around. ben nelson is now ceo of the national association of insurance commissioners for some of them are refusing to enforce the president's picks because they worry that it will cause the president insurance rates to show so next year and this includes risk insolvency as well. lou: health care insurance exchanges in obamacare will have more problems than just a bad website. the dow jones crossing the 16,000 level during trading that fell during the final hours. the s&p is down six, nasdaq lost 37 points. and ordered to pay $1.2 billion to customers, this company has talked abou
, republicans don't have an alternative or they don't seem like they have a solution to all these problems. those numbers could turn back around again. martha: that's a great point. you look at this as you get further down the road and people will start to weave their way down the program. and no doubt there will be people who say, yeah, through, i got understand. the sky didn't fall on me. and this issue may sort of move again as you are referencing. so what do you think republicans need to do if they want to continue to see the numbers they are seeing in this poll? >> they could do nothing. that is an argument some republicans and consequence are using. the employer mandate will be implemented starting the beginning of 2015. so by the time the 2014 elections are rolling around. all those letters in the individual market will be flowing in to people in the employer market which is much more vast than the individual market. but i think republicans ought to be thinking about what kind of changes they would bring to the table, to the healthcare system. nobody likes their insurance company ev
from an old playbook which is, "it's not our fault." how does that play? >> i don't think it works. the president of the united states is on video dozens of times making the promise, repeating it, being emphatic about it. not that he said oegsally in passing if you like your plan you can keep it. he was saying this in response to republican claims that you would not be able to keep your plan even if you liked it. basically the defenders of the law have no arguments to make now. so they've got to choose two villains. one republicans in congress. the other, a valerie jarrett tweet, the president speaking in boston trying to villify insurance companies. you have now seen it in hearings the other day. >> they blame cancellations on the insurance companies who are obeying the laws they passed. >> right. >> the insurance companies are cancelling people because obama care requires them to. >> exactly right. >> it is an interesting argument by the administration. that's the one they have chosen. as far as blaming republicans they appear to be pinning the health care.gov disaster b on the g
is happening to your children as you're feeding these foods from overseas and they don't have to pass the same food standards. it's a kitchen table issue. >> there's no question about it. it is a kitchen table issue. >> i couldn't resist. >> thank you. politics nation with reverend al sharpton starts right now. >>> good evening, ed. and thanks to you for tuning in. new numbers on how president obama's health care laws is helping real people across the country. the health and human service's department says the law has gotten more than half a million americans positioned to have health care. more than 100,000 have chosen plans from the federal and state health care exchanges. and nearly 400,000 have been deemed eligible for medicaid. that is the reality of the president's health care law. half a million people who didn't have insurance before are about to get covered. that's what really matters. the problem with the website are serious. but they will be fixed. the white house says other tweaks to the law will be made sooner rather than later. but all republicans want to do is t
with their clients if they want to properly represent them. clients don't trust the system. a federal public defender in nevada for years. you can be the the best representation but the clients don't see it. clients are asking do i trust you enough to tell you the truth of what happened? i need that information so i can see for example is this a self defense case. there has to be enough time to create a relationship, is she said. that's where the the difference is between rich and poor. the rich because they are paying for their time will have as much time with their lawyer as they need. ". it's a serious thing that they know the system is broken. and the criminal justice across the united states acknowledge deep flaws in the way representation is provided to people. eric also spoke to the american council of chief defender in 2009. we know they lag far behind other justice programs. they constitute about 3 percent of all criminal justice expenditures in our nations largest counties." i'm going to skip ahead. we interview lawyers, who fire appropriate motions and do many other things that attorneys
don't know what hope is until you are in a critical situation and you are saying i hope this and wish that. my hope was just fail, you know everyday i was hoping and praying that i would get out. my story would be not just heard because the story was heard, somebody would believe me and not look at where i come from and my bad character and understand that i didn't commit the crime. so hope to me was like it was overwhelming and every time i got in contact with somebody that i thought could help me or even interest in my case there was hope. if i can write a letter to a person and they can listen and read my letter that was hope to me that maybe they can react and even write me back. so in prison, it was like, without hope in prison, and without, i wanted to say something. i jumped around. i want to say, jeff, the public defenders office was something that really helped me because it was jeff that opened the door to my investigation and to the office in san francisco for innocent project. i was one of the persons that was able to get lawyer from that innocent project but then not hav
on my head and crush me. i don't even have god on my side. the old boys network that got him a lawyer but when friendly with a judge didn't even work of a sweat when it came to his case. it was a double murder trial that didn't last a couple hours. a flawed defense system rendered that almost meaningless. why? he says, you know why? sometimes i think about it. he wonders what the solutions are to the criminal justice system here. to the black community, he talks on and on, indignant but right. mostly he wonders how change happens. sometimes i think about what is it, this mahatma gandhi thing. he cracks your head and you say thank you. he cracks your head again. you have to be animal when you do that. it's an outrage. he pauses and collects himself. i'm not talking from bitterness. he says this and yet how can you let go of bitterness. like a dog licking a wound keeping it open and raw greg bright revisits his past wonders if it's a happy ending because he lives in a yellow house, my pot of gold at the end of a rainbow after finally receiving $190,000 in rest tuition. unending that c
implementing his grand plan. in the western theater, he had two commanders. a man named hallick and don carlos buel. and he was trying to get these two generals in the fall of 1961 to push into kentucky and later into tennessee, but he can't get them to act. he complains about, my generals won't do anything. this is lincoln saying the same thing about mcclellan and other generals as well. and lincoln has also by this time got his own ideas about the war. he wants to push the south at a whole bunch of different points and he's writing about doing this, but again, this is very much similar to what mcclellan is saying. the problem is, the generals have a plan but they won't act. well, finally, in february of 1862, some of the union generals decide they should do something. and ulysses s. grant and flag officer foote in the army take donaldson on the tennessee and cumberland rivers. this is very critical here, because this breaks apart the confederate cordon defense, their defensive system in the west. it completely comes apart. here's where braxton bragg enters the picture. what follows in the co
the money? i know there are little taxes here and little taxes there. if the healthy young people don't come in droves, is this thing going to collapse? >> yes. it will collapse and i think it is destined for collapse and i think most people in the administration acknowledge it's going to collapse. the difference is that a lot of people within the administration and people like harry reid have acknowledged that if but when it does collapse, they hope that we will quickly move towards a single payer healthcare system. that's one of the many problems with this law is that it was built to fail it was built to fail knowing that it would fail and as it failed it would harm many millions of americans. hard-working americans who would lose their jobs and lose their healthcare. >> so what is the solution? i know that you don't like obamacare. i know you want to repeal it but in recognition of where we are, and how we try to inflict the least amount of pain on americans and especially -- i mean, the ones i'm really worried with are the ones who either don't have the or who are sick. >> he yes. i thin
or the military. we are talking about 20%. >> 62 million? >> approximately. 15% don't have any health insurance. the idea that a large percentage of those are not going to sign up for a system when they can get very good comprehensive healthcare at rates as low as or premiums as low as $100 a month. >> you are getting on off topic here. are they going to get the 700 million by march like they said they need to get it off and running smoothly. doesn't look like it's going to be the case. they are going to have to make a decision, julian. delay the individual mandate or delay the fine if you don't have insurance are they not? >> i think that is correct if we get into january and february and don't look like we are hitting those numbers. the reason i think we are going to hit those numbers because again if you consider there are 45 million people that don't have insurance and incentives for them signing rupp so strong, comprehensive healthcare for as little as $100 a month in the premium. a huge portion of that 45 million are going to let go into the exchanges. then you have got another 15 million
&p futures up by 1.5 points. joe mentioned there are a few tests for the markets today, so why don't we take a look at the calendar on the economic side. we'll get the s&p case-shiller index-home prices for september at 9:00 eastern time. later, the consumer confidence number is released for september. we were originally speccing housing starts at 8:30 eastern today. permits will hit the tape, but the government is delaying the starts and completions again. they are still blaming the shutdown for this. the commerce department now plans to share that information on december 18th. >>> we go from the economy to earnings. this morning's horts include hormel, tiffany's, and barns & noble. >>> also, other market related news, takeover premiums are shrink to go historic lows. "the wall street journal" reports more than 9300 deals and so far this year the average premium has only by 19% of a target the week before. that compares to a historic average of 30%. among those factor tos are booming economy, a worry interest rates will rise. market vaum is an issue. you have to look in two different places
that they won. they didn't. we don't live in a capitalistic system we live in a corporate system. we don't live in a country that is fully socially conservative. we live in a country that is living on social issues. we understand that upheld at all that we have to fight and really centering on president obama as he is the bad guy. imagine her a moment that obama were impeached as so many conservatives seem to want. joe biden takes over. how is joe biden different than barack obama in any way even that he's less competent than the current president? joe biden has the same policy deceptions and sodas for the reclaimed him. so i think there is a broad movement that has to be fought. on the republican side, there are a lot of interesting candidates. an interesting guy, ron paul also i disagree with him strenuously on his foreign policy. allen west is an interesting night. his image matters. allen west is somebody that cuts an interesting figure for the republican party. there's other folks. mike pence of indiana. he's kind of laid low so far but i'm hoping he will throw his hat in the ring. one thi
just last week, that he had no inkling that the website would be a mess. >> i don't think i'm stupid enough to go around saying this will be like shopping on amazon or travelocity a week before the website opened if i thought it wasn't going to work. >> reporter: jay carney acknowledged that the president was briefed as early as march. >> the review if you carefully look at it, made observations based on interviews it made recommendations that hhs and cms adopted to improve the site. >> have these changes been made? >> absolutely, the president, ed -- zwl he did follow up. >> as we said repeatedly got regular briefings and was told there were problems that were being addressed. >> reporter: the president's credibility is also on the line from a letter he read from a single mom. that he used to claim the new law is working. >> now, finally, we get to have coverage because of the aca for $160 per month. i was crying the other day when i signed up so much stress li lifted. >> reporter: except the mom said that the tax credit was reduced so the covera is too expensive and the woman said
this together. in a baritone voice he would say if you can't say something good about someone, don't say anything. there was so much respect for this man but along with a philip randolph, who organized the brotherhood of sleeping car porters, represented the men working on the railroad. and when you come to washington and walked through the union station there is a bus. you have martin luther king jr. who was the president of the southern christian leadership conference born in atlanta georgia and then there was roy wilkins, the head of the naacp for the advancement of colored people that were born in minnesota, a wonderful man comed then there was whitney young who was born in kentucky, the dean of social work at atlanta university and later became the head of the national urban league. there was another man by the name of james farmer. farmer had attended the little wiley college in texas, why we texas. and he was part of the dating team -- debate team. they deviated harvard and they won. the graduate study at harvard university became very involved with the naacp and was later one of
of the attention of the popular robert frost but we don't have that division in the same way you don't discover another rockwell matt, do you? >> you said in the war halted id think there were different rockwells for different people with sentimentality and makes me want to write another book i think his subjects were misunderstood during his lifetime he often painted people getting along the humanitarian side of america if you go look at the freedom of speech there will be a lot of years and eyes fragmentary because that painting is about looking and listening. why did i say that? because of the etf of community may be struck people in the '60s as sentimental but now at a time when the real from the government shut down and the pettiness of american politics we pnc that humanitarian ideals. i think he did like the idea of people coming together. he liked everyone to get along. look at the freedom of speech. that lincoln figure rising up he isn't wearing a wedding ring if he might be in integrity is new in town i know he is supposed to be greek or italian but uc the wedding ring their older and
of this video so just thinking further, he says whatever it shows. he lant seen it? >> we don't know why he would be so hope about putting that video in public other than really to show torontoans, those in toronto, that this video is not out there. who knows what the defense is. whether or not he can defend himself even if there is vids owe of me smoking from a glass pipe, you don't really know what's in it. his approval ratings have gone up 5%. they just got a lot of su port rs, fred. he's got a lot of people that really like him. he's a very charming man. he's out in the public eye. he spends a lot of time with his constituents. he has this weekly radio program and he's got a lot of support there locally. >> thanks so much for bringing that to us. appreciate that. there are new details about that deadly shooting at lax. the suspected gunman fired at a tsa officer at point-blank range friday and came back to shoot him again. that tsa officer died. people who saw the terror unfold are now telling their stories. stephanie, what have you heard from people? >> reporter: the terrifying natetur
to do this for people and the president. i don't know why anyone would site is. at least try and help with it. instead of siding with the corporations who want to have all the edge on the security -- on the insurance companies. thank you and god bless the people. from here's kathy montgomery, texas on our republican line. caller: i have been watching yhis president obama trey slithered his way out of this. you can keep your 26-year-old on your parents plan. actually, he's going to get rid of that. next year when our employers kick us off of their plan because obama wants it this way, no one is going to be on insurance. no one's going to have insurance. he is try to push us little by little onto socialized medicine that doesn't work. our family lives in europe. it doesn't work. my nephews can't get simple surgeries that they need. it is always delayed because the government doesn't know how to run things. my advice to people who are getting kicked off the plan, pay the fine until president obama is out of office and i pray to god that our government can get together and fix this mess.
-election sites they don't want it to sink their own re-election. senator gillibrand joining us. we appreciate your time. want to start with the white house meeting your colleagues attended yesterday. voer, there's a lot of frustration among your caucus and constituents about the website. why isn't there value extending the enrollment for a limited period of time to make up for the two months lost by the problems with the site? >> well, what's important to all of america is they get access to affordable health care. we don't want to delay the access. we want to make sure the computer system gets up and running. people can buy a plan affordable and covers things. we want to make sure covered up to 2026, don't get coverage dropped because of pre-existing conditions. that's why we wan to push ahead to make sure they get the coverage they need. >> are you satisfied with the way they handled thing since the rollout? we know the rollout has been handled since the disaster. have they been upfront with people about the failures? >> i think so. the president said yesterday these are huge challenges. we
and prosecutors had done their job to begin with. he's right. i don't want to lose track of that. his attorney was inadequate but he wouldn't have been in the position if everyone else had done their job in the first place. that is pervasive in our system and people working in the trenches is hard to overcome that complacency and their client issen entitled to that. that doesn't provide the information that they need to challenge the prosecution. where we know many of our experts on arson and the fire wasn't arson. when you have evidence that isn't disclosed you have experts that are challenged because there are no resources and you have a system that has burden the public with too many cases and it's impossible for them not to be complacent. we have to remember to be vigilant and challenge a system that doesn't give a person representation are entitled to. >> i wanted to ask you what is it about the culture of prosecution or prosecutors that allows wrongful convictions. i know there have been stories of prosecutors who have been responsible for exonerating individuals who they believe are w
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